9 Diwali books to read with your kids

Storytelling and books form a huge part in the festivities at our home. Naturally, I am always on the lookout for good children’s books on the topic. Here, I have compiled a list of my favourite books on Diwali to read with your kids. I prefer books that focus more on culture than religious instruction, books that have beautiful illustrations, aren’t stereotypical in any way and are age-appropriate. This list is based on these criteria.

1. Diwali lights by Rina Singh

This is a beautiful baby book on the festival, It only talks about the lights, colours and celebrations. Accompanied by photos, and rhyming text, makes this book a great first book. The book is divided into two parts, with the latter part talking a little more in detail about the whys of Diwali.

What stood out for me: Real images of babies and toddlers celebrating Diwali

Recommended for : 0-2 years

2.

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This entry was posted in Books.

Praise vs encouragement- montessori parenting dilemma

Ever since my first module with educational psychology, I find reading up on experiments on conditioning and reinforcement, fascinating. And naturally, my spirit is a positive cheerleader. I love dishing out praise easily. So believe me, this post and the contents that I’ve been trying to follow is not too easy.

At about 2 years of age, V started excellent focus in her work. And I realized, I wasn’t needed to say , ‘Wow!’ Because, her eyes would light up when she finished the task, before the Wow! That is when I learnt that the sensitive periods and work provide enough intrinsic motivation without need for my empty words.

Why I try to avoid “Good jobs!”

  • Words of praise become great extrinsic motivators. This is great for people who need an external push. But with children who are already internally motivated, this is not necessary at all.
  • The joy and accomplishment a child feels on completion of a task is taken away when praise is given precedence.
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Experiences that are rich- pillars of montessori parenting

Maria Montessori stresses the importance of a rich environment that provides the necessary sensorial experiences to a child.
What is a rich experience? Something that provides sensory stimuli, introduces something new or helps practice and helps form neuronal connections with older knowledge.

Why rich experiences?

Everything children see, hear, feel, touch, or even smell impacts their brain and thus influences the way they view and interact with their world—including their family, neighbors, strangers, friends, classmates, and even themselves.

Daniel J. Siegel

Piaget’s theory of cognitive development is one of my many favourites. While he observed that infants actually seek environmental stimulation that promotes their intellectual development, he thought that their initial representations of objects, space, time, causality, and self are constructed only gradually during the first 2 years. He concluded that the world of young infants is an egocentric fusion of the internal and external worlds and that the development of an accurate representation of physical reality depends on the gradual coordination of schemes of looking, listening, and touching.… Click to read the rest